Homeless in Canada

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Updated: 2 days 14 hours ago

No Vacancy: High Rent. No Vacancy. Growing Homelessness

Wed, 17/10/2018 - 2:55pm
In 2016, No Vacancy: Affordability and Homelessness in Vancouver provided a point in time snapshot of the growing affordability crisis within the City of Vancouver. By examining structural factors such as vacancy rates at low-end-of-market, cost of average rent, available income, cost of living, social housing built, and rent supplements provided, No Vacancy concluded that within the then-current environment, “homelessness [would] continue to grow without addressing these key structural issues.” The most recent point-in-time homeless counts, along with updated data on vacancy rates throughout Metro Vancouver suggest this to be the case. Low-income families, specifically single-parent families, are faced with a stagnant supply of affordable housing options and low vacancy rates, contributing to an increasing level of unaffordability. Due to this reality, much of this report focuses on the challenges low-income families encounter when trying to secure appropriate housing. With the crisis spreading, calling Metro Vancouver home is only getting harder.
Categories: Housing

A Modelling Study Exploring the Impact of Homelessness on Rostered Primary Care Utilization in Calgary, Canada 

Wed, 17/10/2018 - 2:55pm
For patients who belonged to physician rosters at a family medicine practice in the core of Calgary, Canada, we compared primary care utilization for those who were stably housed and those experiencing homelessness. In the context of an inner-city primary care clinic in Calgary, Canada, homelessness status is associated with an increased rate of visits to primary care. This work has implications for public health and health systems decision-makers involved in developing equitable health policy, as well as for frontline care providers who serve this vulnerable population.
Categories: Housing

Durham 2017 PIT Count Report

Wed, 17/10/2018 - 2:55pm
On February 15th-17th, 2017 Community Development Council Durham (CDCD) and Durham Mental Health Services (DMHS), in collaboration with numerous partners, conducted Durham’s first Point-in-Time (PiT) Count. With the assistance of 150 volunteers, those who were experiencing sheltered or unsheltered homelessness, or were provisionally accommodated in a public institution or transitional shelter, were surveyed, enumerated or tallied. The results of the PiT Count provide a snapshot of the minimum number of people experiencing homelessness in Durham Region and provides community members and decision makers with additional data to help inform funding and policy decisions. In addition, the results of the PiT Count establish a benchmark against which progress can be measured when future PiT Counts are conducted.
Categories: Housing

Cowichan Valley Regional District Summer Point-In-Time Homeless Count and Housing Needs Survey

Wed, 17/10/2018 - 2:55pm
The purpose of a Point-in-Time Count (PiT) is to obtain a snapshot of people who are absolutely homeless in a community during a set timeframe – usually limited to 24 hours to avoid counting some people twice. The summer 2017 homeless count took place in the Cowichan Valley Region on August 15 and 16 over a 24-hour period. Count sites were located in the Duncan-North Cowichan core area, Ladysmith, Chemainus, Lake Cowichan and Mill Bay. The Count was promoted under the heading of You Count! Count Yourself In. A Housing Needs survey was also undertaken with people who were experiencing Hidden Homelessness and people at risk of homelessness.
Categories: Housing

Comox Valley Point-In-Time Count Report

Wed, 17/10/2018 - 2:55pm
In 2016, the Government of Canada conducted a nation-wide Point in Time Count (PiT Count) to look at homelessness trends across Canada for the first time. Information gained through the count is used to identify themes, challenges and characteristics of homelessness across the country and helps to inform service needs at a local, provincial and federal level. The PiT Count is intended to provide a snapshot of the minimum number of people who are homeless in a community over one 24-hour period. The Comox Valley Coalition to End Homelessness, in partnership with United Way Central and Northern Vancouver Island, participated in this count in the Comox Valley on April 12th, 2016 using the National PiT Count methodology.
Categories: Housing

Dufferin County 2018 Point-In-Time Homeless Count

Wed, 17/10/2018 - 2:55pm
The Dufferin County 2018 Point-in-Time (PiT) Count included an enumeration of individuals experiencing homelessness living unsheltered, emergency sheltered, temporarily sheltered (i.e. couch surfing), and in public locations. The count was conducted by volunteers and staff from the homeless-serving system over a two day period, May 14th and May 15th 2018, throughout the County of Dufferin. This report provides important background information, covers the count methodology, including challenges and limitations, and shares the overall findings as well as findings from specific sub-populations. It includes a discussion section and some recommendations for next steps. This information is meant to be a snapshot of homelessness in Dufferin County at a specific point-in-time. It should be used to help inform service provision, resource allocation, and target setting toward ending homelessness in our community. The results of the Count also fulfill provincial and federal reporting requirements, as well as to help create a Dufferin County By-Name List (BNL) which will inform referrals to housing supports and services within the region.
Categories: Housing

Everyone Counts: 2018 Guelph-Wellington Point-In-Time Count

Wed, 17/10/2018 - 2:55pm
The 2018 Guelph-Wellington Point-in-Time Count included an enumeration of individuals experiencing homelessness living unsheltered, emergency sheltered, temporarily sheltered (i.e. couch surfing), and in unknown locations. The count was conducted over a three-day period in Guelph and over a seven-day period in Wellington County. Volunteers and staff from the homeless-serving system conducted an in-person survey, the results of which were used to estimate the characteristics of the local population experiencing homelessness. Information collected from the survey is also used to inform local service delivery, target resources, and fulfill provincial reporting requirements. This report provides important background information, covers the count methodology, including challenges and limitations, and shares the overall findings, as well as findings from specific sub-populations. The information is meant to provide a snapshot of homelessness in our community at a specific point-in-time and should be used to inform service provision, resource allocation, and target setting toward ending homelessness.
Categories: Housing

Homelessness in Nanaimo: 2018 Point-in-Time Count

Wed, 17/10/2018 - 2:55pm
The nationally coordinated 2018 PiT Count was funded through the Homelessness Partnering Strategy (HPS) and involved the collaboration of over 60 HPS-funded communities across Canada. The Nanaimo Homelessness Coalition, Nanaimo Region John Howard Society (NRJHS), and United Way Central and Northern Vancouver Island (UWCNVI) organized the second consecutive HPS PiT Count in Nanaimo. The count was held on April 18th, 2018. The Nanaimo Homelessness Coalition, formed in 2015, includes a number of non-profit agencies, government bodies, faith groups and residents of the community. The Coalition was preceded by the ‘Nanaimo Working Group on Homelessness’ which has been working to reduce homelessness in Nanaimo since 2001. The name change from ‘Working Group’ to ‘Coalition’ reflects a more proactive approach to the development and implementation of programs and services for the homeless
Categories: Housing

Everyone Counts: St John's Homeless Point-in-Time Count 2018

Wed, 17/10/2018 - 2:55pm
On April 11, 2018, End Homelessness St. John’s (EHSJ) conducted its second biennial Point-in-Time (PiT) Count of the community’s homeless population, titled ‘Everyone Counts’. The initiative, in partnership with Canada’s Homelessness Partnering Strategy (HPS) and the Canadian Observatory on Homelessness (COH), provides a snapshot of the minimum number of people experiencing homelessness on a single day in St. John’s. This includes persons staying in emergency, private and transitional shelters; individuals sleeping outside, in their vehicles, or abandoned buildings (e.g., rough sleepers/unsheltered homeless); those temporarily staying at someone else’s place (e.g., couch surfers); or persons in institutions with no permanent or stable housing. With funding from HPS, the City of St. John’s, and United Way NL, EHSJ conducted its 2018 Count to gain a broader understanding of the nature of homelessness in St. John’s, and included a special focus in this Count on persons experiencing homelessness within the province’s correctional institutions. The 2018 Count determined that at least 165 people were experiencing homelessness on the night of April 11, 2018, with 9% incarcerated in provincial correctional institutions. As noted, this represents the minimum number of those experiencing homelessness, as many individuals in precarious housing situations are not visibly homeless (i.e., couch surfers, rough sleepers), and are thus undercounted. The Count represents the tip of the iceberg, however: during the course of a year, EHSJ estimates that approximately 800 people experience homelessness in St. John’s2 . The Count also affirms that homelessness is not a choice; while all respondents faced barriers in obtaining housing, not wanting permanent housing was not one of them.
Categories: Housing

At Home in Winnipeg: Localizing Housing First as a Culturally Responsive Approach to Understanding and Addressing Urban Indigenous Homelessness

Wed, 17/10/2018 - 2:55pm
Winnipeg is a mid-sized prairie city. Its roots run deep in the community, with a strong sense of resiliency and hope among the agencies that work tirelessly to support those in need. The manner in which Winnipeg’s community responded to increasing levels of homelessness over the last decade forms the basis of the analysis presented in this report. In particular, the objective is to examine the At Home/Chez Soi (AHCS) project and how a number of organizations came together to launch a transformative approach to addressing homelessness for those struggling with mental health issues. Our specific focus is on how local capacity was built and structured to undertake was has been called the largest demonstration project of its kind in the world (Macnaughton et al., 2010). The Winnipeg approach was distinct and involved the inclusion of Indigenous practices to deliver Housing First (HF). This report has a particular focus on how a unique governance model emerged out of partnerships among community-based organizations, government, researchers, and others who collaboratively strengthened local capacity while ending homelessness.
Categories: Housing

The Implementation of a Rent Assistance Program and Its Impacts on Recovery Outcomes for Individuals Experiencing Chronic Homelessness

Wed, 17/10/2018 - 2:55pm
This study explored the experiences of persons experiencing chronic homelessness with and without rent assistance. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 12 participants in order to determine if and how rent assistance impacted participants’ narratives of recovery. These narrative interviews, along with a focus group conducted with 10 support workers, explored implementation factors impacting recovery narratives. The findings suggest that access to rent assistance helps to promote recovery outcomes, conceptualized as life transitions (streets to home, home to community, and past to future), among individuals experiencing chronic homelessness. These transitions were enhanced by various participant, program, and community factors.
Categories: Housing

Ending Poverty in Edmonton: Year One Progress Report (2017- 2018)

Wed, 17/10/2018 - 2:55pm
Game Changers are the larger actions, made up of smaller ones spread across the community, that will have the net result of essential and radical change for those experiencing poverty. The Game Changers are: 1. Eliminate Racism 2. Livable Incomes 3. Affordable Housing 4. Accessible & Affordable Transit 5. Affordable & Quality Child Care 6. Access to Mental Health Services & Addictions Support The EndPovertyEdmonton Secretariat is reporting on progress across the movement by Game Changer. We want to speak to what’s working (and what isn’t), in order to address our work to eliminate poverty. The Secretariat does this work as a backbone to the EPE movement.
Categories: Housing

2018 Youth Homeless Count In Metro Vancouver 

Wed, 17/10/2018 - 2:55pm
The methodology for the 2018 Youth Homeless Count differed from a traditional Point-in-Time (PiT) homeless count approach by carrying out data collection over the course of nine days, rather than 24 hours. This new method was designed to provide more opportunities to make contact with youth experiencing homelessness across the region. The focus of data analysis for the 2018 count was to explore the different circumstances of youth experiencing homelessness who identified as Aboriginal/Indigenous and those who did not, specifically to assist with funding allocation and service provision in the region
Categories: Housing

10th ANNUAL Report Card on Homelessness for Nelson, BC

Wed, 17/10/2018 - 2:55pm
This 10th Annual Report Card on Homelessness for Nelson (JUNE 2018) will bring the reader a better understanding of those who are homeless and at risk of homelessness, what contributes to homelessness in our community and what we can and are doing about it. It is designed to both encourage questions and inform solutions.
Categories: Housing

Racial and Ethnic Disparities in the Lifetime Prevalence of Homelessness in the United States

Wed, 17/10/2018 - 2:55pm
Homelessness in the United States is often examined using cross-sectional, point-in-time samples. Any experience of homelessness is a risk factor for adverse outcomes, so it is also useful to understand the incidence of homelessness over longer periods. We estimate the lifetime prevalence of homelessness among members of the Baby Boom cohort (n = 6,545) using the 2012 and 2014 waves of the Health and Retirement Study (HRS), a nationally representative survey of older Americans. Our analysis indicates that 6.2 % of respondents had a period of homelessness at some point in their lives. We also identify dramatic disparities in lifetime incidence of homelessness by racial and ethnic subgroups. Rates of homelessness were higher for non-Hispanic blacks (16.8 %) or Hispanics of any race (8.1 %) than for non-Hispanic whites (4.8 %; all differences significant with p < .05). The black-white gap, but not the Hispanic-white gap, remained significant after adjustment for covariates such as education, veteran status, and geographic region.
Categories: Housing

Raising Canada: A Report on Children in Canada, Their Health and Well-Being

Wed, 17/10/2018 - 2:55pm
The purpose of this brief report is to paint a high-level picture of children in Canada, and their health and wellbeing, using readily available, reputable sources of data. We begin by describing the current population of children across Canada and trends over time. Do we have more or fewer children in Canada now compared to the past? What about the future? Which parts of the country do they live in? The report then turns to the health and wellbeing of our children. What do we know about the health status of children in Canada, both mental and physical? What about key social determinants of health, given their importance to health and wellbeing? How does Canada compare to other countries with similar standards of living?
Categories: Housing

2018 Affordable Housing Budget Expenditure Highlights in Canada 

Wed, 17/10/2018 - 2:55pm
2018 has seen a significant amount of change and investment in social, non-profit, and affordable housing across the country. In the context of a dynamic and changing housing policy framework across the country, this report examines the commitments made by provinces and territories in their respective 2018-2019 budgets and highlights recent housing announcements and initiatives underway within specific provinces and territories. Although it is not meant to be exhaustive of all measures and policies directly impacting the social, non-profit, and affordable housing sector, the aim of the report is to provide a snapshot of budgetary and related housing developments thus far in 2018, and where possible, offers a glimpse into expected high level housing policy developments in each jurisdiction. It should also be noted that in November 2017 the federal government released the National Housing Strategy, which contained $40 billion in investments in affordable housing over the next 10 years. A number of measures contained in the Strategy require cost-matching from provinces and territories. In April 2018, federal, provincial and territorial Ministers responsible for housing (with the exception of Québec) endorsed a multilateral Housing Partnership Framework. Bilateral agreements have begun to be signed, which will specify how provinces and territories will deliver and cost-match federal funds for National Housing Strategy programming.
Categories: Housing

Vancouver Homeless Count 2018

Wed, 17/10/2018 - 2:55pm
As the following report by Urban Matters documents, the City of Vancouver’s 2018 point-in-time homeless count found 2,181 people homeless in Vancouver on March 14, 2018, with 1,522 people sheltered and 659 on the street. While the total number represents only a 2% increase from last year, it is nonetheless the highest number since the first regional homeless count in 2005, signaling a continuing and growing concern about the welfare of Vancouver residents who are marginalized and about how we respond to homelessness in our city. The report highlights that people who identify as Indigenous continue to be vastly overrepresented in homelessness in Vancouver. In 2018, the City’s collaboration with Lu’ma Native Housing Society and the Aboriginal Homelessness Steering Committee on a coordinated count provided opportunities to explore new methods of engagement and to learn from our partners. For a comprehensive analysis of Aboriginal/Indigenous homelessness, please refer to the report on Aboriginal Homelessness – 2018 Count in Metro Vancouver. The count also shows that approximately one-half of respondents had been homeless for less than one year. This statistic points to the fluidity of homelessness. The fact that someone becomes homeless does not necessarily mean they will continue to be. The support people find to access social and supportive housing is vital to ensure that pathways out of homelessness are available to all.
Categories: Housing

Two-Eyed Seeing of Indigenous Homelessness in Halton: A Community Needs Assessment

Wed, 17/10/2018 - 2:55pm
This is the second report arising from the Indigenous Homelessness Needs Assessment and Knowledge Sharing Project (the project) led by Halton Community Legal Services (HCLS). We conducted interviews with 12 people who selfidentified as Indigenous and were experiencing, or had experienced, homelessness in Halton Region. This report documents these interviews to help address the knowledge gap around the needs of the low-income Indigenous population in Halton as they relate to homelessness and the risk of homelessness. HCLS is a community legal clinic funded by Legal Aid Ontario. The project is being undertaken in the spirit of reconciliation, recognizing that HCLS plays an integral role in the provision of legal services and access to justice for Indigenous people in Halton Region. The Indigenous Homelessness Needs Assessment and Knowledge Sharing Project is part of HCLS’s effort to enhance its services to meet the unique needs of the Indigenous community in Halton. The project is funded in part by the Government of Canada’s Homelessness Partnering Strategy, Legal Aid Ontario and the Advocacy Centre for Tenants-Ontario.
Categories: Housing

Host Homes Handbook: A Resource Guide for Host Home Programs

Wed, 17/10/2018 - 2:55pm
Short-term host homes are an intervention for youth who are currently experiencing homelessness for any variety of reasons, including but not limited to family conflict, poverty, gender identity and sexual orientation. The goal of short-term host homes is to provide a safe, temporary, welcoming space for up to six months where the young person has time to repair their relationships with self-identified family or make decisions about other housing options with the support of a caring housing case manager. Successful implementations of short-term host homes have generally been volunteer-based programs, with stays lasting from three to six months; however, other successful implementations addressing community needs have existed in the short-term housing system. Providing short-term host homes are a cost-effective and successful model for preventing youth homelessness in a wide range of cases.
Categories: Housing